Archive for the ‘Articles published on SLO’ category

Determinative Pronouns in Russian

August 23, 2010

Determinative pronouns are words that are used to emphasize nouns and pronouns. The function of determinative pronouns is to define one or more objects in a class of similar ones. In Russian, this group of pronouns includes the following words:

сам, it corresponds to English pronouns ending in -self.
самый, it corresponds to ‘the very’ in expressions like “the very same” or “at the very end”
весь ‘the whole’ , ‘entire’, ‘all
каждый ‘each, every’
любой ‘any’, ‘anyone’
другой ‘another’
всякий ‘any‘ or ‘every’
иной ‘ another’, ‘other’
всяческий ‘all kinds of’

Russian determinative pronouns agree in gender, number and case of nouns they modify.

The article on the website covers the usage and the declension patterns of Russian determinative pronoun.

The original article on SLO: Russian Determinative Pronouns

Short form of adjectives in Russian

July 26, 2010

Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

In Russian, most qualitative adjectives have short forms. Short form adjectives exist only in predicate nominative form. They have masculine, femine, neuter and plural forms and do not decline.

Relational adjectives, and all adjectives with a stem ending in suffixes –ск– and –ян– do not have short forms in Russian.

The article on the website covers the usage, formation and particular cases of Russian short-form adjectives.

The original article on SLO: Short form of Russian adjectives

Interrogative Words in Russian

June 7, 2010

Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

Interrogative pronouns and adverbs are words used in different kinds of questions. The most frequently used interrogative words in Russian are:

кто ‘who’
что ‘what’
какой ‘which, what kind of’
где ‘where’
куда ‘where to’
откуда ‘where from’
как ‘how’
сколько ‘how much, how many’

The article on the website covers the declension patterns of Russian interrogative pronouns, as well as the usage of these words in different kinds of questions.

The original article on SLO: Russian Interrogative Words

Declension of adjectives in Russian

May 28, 2010

Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

Russian adjectives  change their form to agree with the gender, number or case of nouns they modify. In singular, the endings of Russian long-form adjectives express grammatical gender, number and case. In plural, they express only number and case.

There are three declension types of Russian adjectives:

  1. Declension of qualitative and relational adjectives
  2. Declension of possessive adjectives with stem in -ий
  3. Declension of possessive adjectives ending in -ин(-ын), -ов(-ев)

The article on the website covers peculiarities of all these declension types.

The original article on SLO: Declension of Russian adjectives

Demonstrative Pronouns in Russian

November 3, 2009

Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

Russian demonstrative pronouns have two distinct forms: “этот”, used to point out a person or an object that is nearer to the speaker, andтот” which refers to a person or an object more distant from the speaker.

The behavior of demonstrative pronouns is similar to the behavior of adjectives; they also decline and agree in gender, number and case of nouns.

The original article on SLO: Russian Demonstrative Pronouns

Russian nouns gender

October 28, 2009

Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

Russian nouns have three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter. The gender of nouns is important because it determine the forms of its modifiers in the phrase, i.e. related adjectives, pronouns, some forms of numeral etc.

The division of nouns into masculine, feminine and neuter have no well-grounded explanation. Neuter nouns usually have inanimate referents. Masculine and feminine nouns may denote both animate and inanimate referents.

It is possible to find out the gender of most Russian nouns by the last letter of their dictionary form. In the vast majority of instances, masculine nouns end in a consonant, feminine nouns end in –а/-я, neuter nouns end in –о/-е/-ё. However, there are also a lot of deviations from these rules.

In some groups of nouns, the grammatical gender is not determined by the last letter of the dictionary form. These groups are:

  1. indeclinable nouns;
  2. nouns of common gender;
  3. nouns ending in -ь;
  4. some masculine nouns ending in а/я;
  5. some neuter nouns ending in -мя;
  6. nouns denoting professions and occupation that are masculine, but sometimes may behave as feminine.

    The original article on SLO: Gender of Russian nouns

    Possessive pronouns in Russian

    October 23, 2009

    Overview of the article published on the SLO website:

    Possessive pronouns are words which are used in place of a noun or another pronoun and indicate ownership (in English, these are pronouns “my”, “your”, “his”, “her” etc.). In Russian, as in English, these pronouns reflect all three persons. Also, they agree in gender, number, and case with the modified noun.

    The Russian languages has also a particular pronoun свой, called reflexive possessive pronoun, that mean ‘one’s own’ and shows the ownership to subject of the verb in a phrase. This pronoun can be used only if the possessor and the subject are in the same phrase.

    The article presents the declension patterns of all Russian possessive pronouns.

    The original article on SLO: Russian Possessive Pronouns